It’s not a race.

Since starting my movement toward a more minimalist lifestyle, I have been stricken with the wish to quickly cut away all my unneeded possessions. On several occasions I have had to remind myself that minimalism is not a race with a finish line or a competition with a prize. There are no losers. The speed with which someone can adopt a simpler lifestyle and remove their excess material baggage depends on what kind of lifestyle they lived before. Some of us can easily shed a large percentage of our possessions in just a few days.  This is not the case for me.

In a slightly different situation, I might be very happy simply giving my items away to friends or donating them to charity. However, given the level of debt I have accumulated by purchasing so much junk, it would not be financially healthy to give things away. I need to sell as much as possible to recoup at least some of the cost of my old habits.

The act of paring down my collection is no longer emotionally difficult. I have gotten beyond the feeling of loss watching the stacks of miscellany slowly leave for different homes. Only the logistics of selling so many items remains painful. For the most part, dumping items locally is less profitable than moving them on the Internet, but online sales means time spent boxing, labeling, and shipping. Selling locally is more convenient, but the extra revenue generated by Internet buyers has me torn. For now I am trying a two-pronged approach. Locally sold items will be those that are difficult to ship or are not worth very much. Stuff posted online will be anything valuable enough to justify the time spent in shipping.

I have a few notes for anyone who wants to live more simply and is starting in a similar situation. These points might be obvious to some people, but they were not clear to me at first.

– Selling stuff, especially when trying to get the most out of your items, is difficult, even if you purchased all of it below market value. You need to find a buyer, work out a price you can both be happy with, and if the item(s) sell online, you need to ship them. All of this takes time and time is not always plentiful.

– Do not give up. I have shed material possessions for a couple of weeks and I have recently realized how large an iceberg I am trying to melt. It is easy to get discouraged when looking at others who have already transitioned into minimalism or had more freedom in the beginning to simply give stuff away. We can eventually get there too.

Be methodical. Make a plan and stick to it. Write down what you get rid of, how much you make, and what you are going to purge next.  Systematically paring down will help you stick to your goals and give you a stronger feeling of accomplishment.

The biggest enemy to our goal of living with less is the creeping desire to slip back under the blanket of excessive consumerism. The blanket may be warm, but the protection it provides is imagined, and all it can offer is a limit to how free we can be.

It’s not a race.

One thought on “It’s not a race.

  1. You’re so right, it takes time. I think when we decide we’re going to get rid of things that we no longer want/need/use, we don’t always think of it in a realistic manner, or at least I didn’t. I have so much stuff in our house and sad to say that it is a slow process, not a quick one like I had first thought it to be. It’s not that I have a hard time throwing things away because I’m not using them, it’s hard because I don’t want to waste anything, and that is what’s hard for me. Good post, glad I found your blog!

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